Category: Los Angeles County

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Biography of William Thomas Martin of El Monte California

“Let the world wag as it willI’ll be gay and happy still”— This little jingle for a slogan together with “Don’ Worry,” constituted a rule for longevity as set forth by William T. Martin, better known by the early pioneers of El Monte district as “Tooch” Martin, who until his death in the year of this edition at almost ninety two years of age, was as alert and interested in the activities and events of the times as he ever was.  His knowledge of the early events and his numerous experiences, together with his keen memory, regarding same, materially aided

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Biography of William C. Martin of El Monte California

William C. Martin was born in what is now Red River County, Texas, January 29, 1824.  His father, Gabriel N. Martin was a native of North Carolina, who went to Texas in 1812.  His mother was formerly Henrietta Wright.  She was born in Alabama.  Mr. Martin’s father was a wealthy farmer and a prominent man in his section.  He was for some years a judge and a leader in political circles.  He also engaged largely as a contractor, furnishing supplies for the Indian agencies of the United States Government.  He was killed by the Indians in 1834.  The subject of

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Biography of Curtis C. M. Maltman of El Monte California

Prominent and esteemed among the citizens of El Monte and for fifteen years, editor and owner of the El Monte Gazette, Curtis C.M. Maltman served the community conscientiously and well.  In addition to his work of recording local events, and moulding public opinion by his able editorials, Mr. Maltman also served the community for five years in the capacity of the postmaster, which office he held at his death in 1928. Born December 20, 1869, in Jackson Michigan, the son of John Maltman, a native of Canada, Curtis Maltman was educated in the public schools of Jackson, and later completed

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Biography of Dr. Obed Macy of El Monte California

Dr. Obed Macy, born on the Island of Nantucket in Massachusetts, in 1801, was prominent in the history of Los Angeles.  He first settled in El Monte in 1850, following his arrival in California from Indiana.  He spent only a few months in El Monte, moving to Los Angeles where he rented and conducted the Bella Union Hotel, and later, developed the Alameda Baths, located at Main and Macy Streets.  The family was honored in the naming of Macy Street in that city for Dr. Macy. Dr. Macy’s son, Oscar, for a time was a resident of El Monte district.  He

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Biography of Fannie Lewis of El Monte California

Mrs. Fannie Lewis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Bunyard, was born in Grayson County, Texas, and with her parents, two sisters, and three brothers, came to California in 1868, in a wagon train.  The caravan was six months on the way, and brought a large number of cattle.  Landing at Puente, the family remained at that point a month, and then came on to El Monte.  Fannie Bunyard, which was her name at that time, was married in 1884, to Ira D. Lewis, a farmer and a native son of California, who died in 1909. Ira D. Lewis

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Biography of David Lewis of El Monte California

David Lewis was one of El Monte’s earliest settlers, and by his active, honorable life, won the respect and esteem of the entire community; a law abiding citizen, a liberal in religion, unhampered by creeds, just to all men, kind and charitable to the needy.  His life was so well spent that all who knew him felt bereaved at his death. Mr. Lewis was born and reared in Chemung County, New York, the year of his birth being 1820.  he crossed the plains, deserts and mountains of this state, and located in the vicinity of El Monte in 1851.  He

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Biography of Thomas H. Lambert of El Monte California

Numbered among the progressive citizens of El Monte is Thomas H. Lambert, who as a farmer, horticulturist and, of recent years, sub-divider and realtor, holds a prominent place among the successful men in this section.  He is a native of Franklin County, Arkansas, born April 27, 1870, in the vicinity of Fort Smith; his father Frank M., was born in England and came to the United States in about 1845, settling in Alabama.  Later he moved to Arkansas and engaged in farming in that section, until the outbreak of the Civil War, when he left his farm, shouldered a musket

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Biography of J. Scott Killian of El Monte California

J. Scott Killian, for years prominent in the agricultural development of El Monte and vicinity, especially in the walnut industry, was born in the State of Georgia, June 3, 1856.  He was the son of L.A. Killian, farmer, and Martha (Lee) Killian, both natives of North Carolina. His education was received in the public schools fo his home community where he remained for a time after becoming of age.  In the early eighties he moved to San Marcos, Texas, where for a time he farmed, following which he engaged in the mercantile business. In 1887, he came to California, stopping first at

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Biography of Albert Lee Kerns of El Monte California

Albert Lee Kerns, a resident farmer located in the vicinity of El Monte, is one of the prominent men of this section, having proven his right to success by his own efforts, which have brought him a competence. He is a native of Paris, Kentucky, born September 6, 1869; his father, Levi Kerns, was a native of Bourbon County, Kentucky.  Levi, became a miller in manhood and plied his trade uninterruptedly until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he enlisted in the Fourth Regiment Kentucky Infantry, known as the Orphaned Brigade, and served to the close of the

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Biography of G. H. Kallmeyer of El Monte California

G. H. Kallmeyer, farmer of this district since the eighties until his death in 1909, was born in Montgomery County, Missouri, August 27, 1840.  He was the son of John and Mary Kallmeyer, who were natives of Germany, coming to America in the early days and settling in Missouri. G. H. Kallmeyer, in receiving his early education walked five miles each day to reach the country school of his home community.  Upon reaching his majority, Mr. Kallmeyer engaged in farming until in 1886, when he came to California.  He first stopped in Spadra, where he remained a few months, and