Taking into consideration the accessibility of home properties, in the various parts of San Mateo County, to San Francisco, their beautiful and inspiring surroundings, balmy climate, modern type of improvements and the representative class of neighbors-the cost of property in this community is surprisingly low.

Property values vary of course in each section, according to the nearness to railroad or trolley station, the class of improvements and the natural surroundings.

The average suburban home can be reached as quickly and easily as the residential sections across the bay or in the outlying districts of San Francisco; while the price paid per front foot for peninsula suburban home sites is from one-half to one-third the price of property, similar in appearance and improvements, across the bay; and from one-third to one-fifth the price of that in San Francisco. Property which is suitable for the erection of the highest priced residences costing from $3,000 of $12,000 or even $50,000 each, can be bought for $60 per front foot, while similar property in San Francisco, such as West Clay Park or Presidio Terrace, sells for as high as $250 to $300 per front foot. These choice metropolitan residential sections are practically no further from the center of the city than the most desirable of San Mateo County’s home sites.

The following comparative figures were secured from the most prominent real estate dealers in San Mateo County and San Francisco, making a specialty of peninsula property. They represent the price per front foot of lots averaging 150 feet deep, with all improvements including street work, gutters, cement sidewalks, parking, sewer work and gas and water mains.

Beginning from the northern end of the county, the first city that demands our attention is South San Francisco. This is not a suburban community. Town residence property here varies from $10 per front foot to $25. Industrial property averages $1 per square foot.

Residential property in San Bruno, Millbrae, Lomita Park and Beresford varies from as low as $15 per front foot to $20 and $30, the last two figures being for the most desirable suburban property.

Easton, Burlingame and San Mateo offer the prospective investor a range of prices of from $20 to $60 per front foot. Of these three sections, Easton is the nearest to San Francisco and property a trifle lower than in Burlingame and San Mateo.

Hillsborough, located adjacent to Burlingame and San Mateo, has the distinction of containing the highest priced property in the county. Villa sites of an acre each, being held at about $4,000, with very little property for sale.

At Belmont, still further south, property is figured in acreage rather than in town lots, the price varying from $1,500 to $3,000 per acre, with limited improvements.

In San Carlos, acreage is also sold from $1,000 to $3,000; while city lots bring from $15 to $40 per front foot.

Redwood City residence property displays a greater variation than any other district upon the peninsula. Beautiful residence lots fully improved and only a short walk from the station can be purchased for as little as $10 per front foot; while other property ranges as high as $60 per front foot.

At Menlo Park and Atherton, residence sites are figured principally in acreage ranging from $1,500o to $3,000 per acre. Very attractive half and quarter acre home parks can be purchased in these locations at corresponding prices.

On the coast side of the county where the land is chiefly valuable for farming purposes, hill land sells for about $100 per acre while the fertile soil in and about Pescadero is worth about $750 per acre.

Beach residence property in the neighborhood of Halfmoon Bay sells at from $5. to $30. per front foot.

In ten years, the business of the Recorder’s office has increased 600%. 1915 was a banner year, records having been broken in the department showing realty transfers, building contracts and other documents indicating development. Additional figures from this office show more than four million dollars worth of building construction under way.

Figures upon the total value of all assessed property in San Mateo County as far back as 1880 show astonishing increase. In 1880 this was $7,764,610; in 1890, $13,595,230; in 1900, $14,421,018; and in 1910, $27,573,681. In the following period every year shows a distinct gain. In 1911, $30,346,078; in 1912, $30,739,041; in 1913, $30,693,920; in 1914, $31,221,825; and in 1915, $33,836,225.