San Bruno

San Bruno outgrew its boundaries, merged with Lomita Park and incorporated a city which has the distinction of being, from the standpoint of area, the largest in the county. Its rapid development has forced San Bruno to contract for sewer, street and bridge work, costing $66,000; to issue bonds for a $20,000 schoolhouse and to call an election to provide for more adequate water service and fire protection.

A bank has just been incorporated for San Bruno. Taking these activities into consideration in conjunction with a Street Paving Commission, San Bruno is beginning to utilize its possibilities in a manner that is winning the admiration of its neighboring communities. There has been more building activity in this town during the past year (1915) than in the last three or four years combined.

San Bruno is located at the junction of the State Highway and the County Road out of San Francisco, which meet at Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

San Bruno is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad, the United Railroads and the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company. It is located 11 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 13.1 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco.

The estimated population is 1,752.

Lomita Park

Lomita Park is a thriving little community close to Millbrae and adjacent to San Bruno. In fact, Lomita Park and San Bruno form one thickly settled community, with Millbrae further south growing toward them. Each is a distinct town as far as religious, fraternal and educational advantages are concerned.

Lomita Park is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad, the United Railroads and the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company. It is located 12 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 15.3 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco.

The estimated population is 345.

Millbrae

The little village of Millbrae is located a few miles south of Lomita Park and adjoining the newly created district of Easton, Much. of the Millbrae territory is the property of the D. O. Mills estate, which was laid out by Olmstead, the famous landscape gardener of New York.

Recently Millbrae has added many new homes to its colony of bungalows. It is located sufficiently far south to escape the fog which occasionally rolls over the extreme northern portion of the county, yet close enough to San Francisco to be within very comfortable commuting distance.

Millbrae is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad, the United Railroads and the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company. It is located 14 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 16.8 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco.

The estimated population is 468.

Eaton

Easton, which is really a subdivision of Burlingame, recently began a remarkable growth. Easton’s hills, traversed by the famous Easton Drive, proved a lure for many San Franciscans. The number of homes erected in 1914 and 1915 exceeded the construction of any two previous years.

Easton, is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad, the United Railroads, the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company, and an independent electric railway which connects the foothill residences of this community with the main carriers from San Francisco. It is located 15 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 17 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco.

The population of Easton is figured in that of Burlingame, of which it is a subdivision.

Among peninsula cities, none have shown a more remarkable growth than Burlingame, celebrated for its aristocratic tone, its country clubs, polo grounds, well paved streets and excellent schools.

Burlingame

From a picturesque hamlet, Burlingame has become an ideal suburban city. So rapid has been this growth, that today more commuters leave Burlingame station daily than any other point between San Francisco and San Jose.

The business section of the city is well built, but thus far its enterprises are of the kind that supply the wants of the immediate territory in which they are situated.

The town, in addition to its charms as a commuter’s paradise, has other possibilities that should not be overlooked. The eastern boundaries skirt the bay at a point one mile distant from the railroad, which portion of the city will undoubtedly be seized upon, in the future as a site for large industrial plants.

There are two elementary schools, four churches, fraternal orders, clubs and other organizations.

Burlingame has experienced a pronounced building boom during the last few years, with a quickening in real estate values. As far back as eight years, it was told how a lot on the main street of the city, which had been bought for $480, to be used as a garage site by a wealthy family living back on the hills, was sold for $3,000. Today this lot is held at $20,000.

In 1915 more than seventy new homes were erected in this attractive community.

It is a fact of historical interest that some of the land now occupied by the town was formerly owned by Mr. Anson Burlingame who was minister to China, and subsequently Chinese minister to the western world.

Burlingame is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad, the United Railroads and the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company. It is located 16 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 17.8 miles, along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco.

The estimated population is 4,209 including the Easton Addition.