Hillsborough

Hillsborough, known as the “municipality of millionaires,” and richer per capita than any other city in the world, is an attractive and altogether unique suburban community extending along part of two sides of the town of San Mateo and the westerly boundary of Burlingame. It covers six and a quarter square miles, and although much of the land is occupied, it has only a little over one hundred residences.

Here on rolling foothills at the base of Black Mountain, nestling among the luxuriant shrubbery and lofty trees, are the estates of many of California’s oldest and wealthiest families.

With its famous Burlingame Country Club, San Mateo Polo Clubs, golf links, sweeping lawns and gardens, beautiful homes and winding drives, Hillsborough and its environs is one of the show spots of the state.

In 1910 Hillsborough was incorporated as a city of the sixth class in order to prevent annexation to San Mateo, and at the same time put into effect what the incorporators considered an ideal form of government. Another object of the wealthy city builders was to preserve the sylvan aspect of the countryside and prevent the crowded effect of an ordinary city.

As a result Hillsborough has become a unique municipality. It has no sidewalks, store, saloon, hotel, boarding house, newspaper, theater, post office, telegraph office or express office.

The town’ hall, aside from its beauty of structure has a historical interest in that it was reconstructed from the original Howard family residence for which the timbers were brought around the Horn in the early days.

Although Hillsborough is separated from the Southern Pacific and United Railroads by the towns of Burlingame and San Mateo, it may be regarded nevertheless as served by these lines. The Peninsula Rapid Transit Company passes along the State Highway within easy reach to the east of the town. It is located 17 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and -Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 18.8 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Street, San Francisco.

The estimated population is 953.

San Mateo

San Mateo, the largest city in the county, is -primarily a residential community and does not seek large manufacturing enterprises; in fact, the city by a vote decided to be a home community and leave the manufacturing industries to seek locations along Redwood City’s water front, or South San Francisco..

Public improvements have kept pace with the city’s growth, evidence of which is shown in its many miles of well paved asphalt streets and concrete sidewalks, and an excellent sewer system.

The city of San Mateo is best known as the “Floral City” because of its- wonderful growth of flowers and shrubbery.

“The Floral City,” although a region of homes, is desirable from every viewpoint-social, commercial, educational, and religious. It has a large and prosperous business district. Reaching out from San Mateo like the ribs of a fan, are a number of points of interest to the visitor-the famous Crystal Springs Drive past the Spring Valley dam, impounding the beautiful lakes that supply San Francisco with water; Coyote Point; Leslie Salt Works, producing 30,000 tons of salt annually; San Mateo Beach and oyster beds, surrounding country estates; scenic drives and walks in all directions.

“A very pleasant and enchanting lawn, situated amidst a grove of trees at the foot of a small hill,” wrote Vancouver in describing the situation in 1792.

Educational and religious advantages are exceptionally good. There is a divinity school of the Protestant Episcopal Church, an accredited high school, four grammar schools and a free kindergarten. The churches having houses of worship include the Protestant Episcopal, the Roman Catholic, the Congregational and the Methodist Episcopal. The Christian Science Church also holds services. Good order is preserved by a well organized police department, and the utmost security to life and property is assured throughout the community. There is a free public library with about 8,000 volumes.

There are about thirty fraternal orders, clubs and other social organizations, Red Cross Hospital, two banks and three newspapers.

Minimum insurance rates are enjoyed by reason of a well equipped fire department. Property receives a very low assessment rate for taxation purposes. The entire city is lighted by electricity. Gas is available for every house.

The San Mateo Board of Trade performs all the functions of a Chamber of Commerce for this section of the county. The manager of this is Paul Pinckney. This body is commencing an active campaign for the up-building of the central portion of the peninsula.

San Mateo is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad, the United Railroads, of which it is the southern terminus, and the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company. It is located 18 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 19.8 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco. It is also the center of a number of auto transportation lines, serving all parts of the county.

The estimated population is 6,500.

Belmont

Belmont, the first county seat, is admirably located in the Canada Diable, a miniature valley, flaring to the bay. By its beauty in early days, Belmont attracted such men as Colonel Cipriani, William C. Ralston, Governor McDougall and Senator Sharon, who

had there homes there. Much is expected for the future of this section.

Belmont is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad and the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company. It is located 22 miles from the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 24.6 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco.

The estimated population is 735.

San Carlos

This pretty little village lies adjacent to Redwood City and is a comparatively new homesite. Particularly noteworthy is the frontage of this community at the Southern Pacific Station, where it is tastefully embellished with flowering shrubs and trees. The streets are well laid out and much improvement work has been accomplished.

San Carlos is served by the Southern Pacific Railroad, and the Peninsula Rapid Transit Company. It is located 23 miles from-the Southern Pacific’s Third and Townsend Street Depot, San Francisco; and 25.6 miles along the State Highway from Fifth and Market Streets, San Francisco.

The estimated population is 270.